Tag Archive for california ballot measures

American River Democrats make several endorsements

The American River Democrats’ September meeting was filled with information about upcoming issues, and the club made several endorsements for the November ballot.

Andrew Kehoe, an advocate for Sacramento’s Measure B was on hand to introduce us to the measure and the benefits it would bring to the area. Measure B is a half-cent sales tax targeted to transportation projects and maintenance in the county. Kehoe pointed out that with the current quarter cent tax expiring, the effect would be just a quarter cent above the current rate.

Mike Penrose of the Sacramento Transportation Authority was also on hand to provide more information about the impact and status. Measure B would adopt a “Fix-It-First” approach in the first five years of implementation-“filling pot holes” and making needed repairs and improvements to existing roads, distributing the money to Sacramento County communities and unincorporated county areas. It would also provide future funding for some larger scale projects, such as the Capital Southeast Expressway, a highway connecting Folsom, Rancho Cordova, and Elk Grove south of the 50 Freeway. Also, widening the Capital City Freeway between downtown and Interstate 80, extension of light rail service to the Natomas area and the airport, and much more.

There is still much concern about the environmental impact of some potential projects, especially Discovery Park if light rail is extended. Penrose pointed out that any new projects still have to go through environmental review and public approval process, and that Measure B only provides a funding mechanism.

The club voted to endorse Measure B. for more information visit www.MeasureB-Yes.com.

Melissa Romero of Californians Against Waste also joined us to discuss Proposition 67, the plastic grocery bag ban.

A state-wide ban one single use plastic grocery bags was passed by the state legislature in 2014, in an effort to reduce the overwhelming pollution caused by these lightweight, throwaway plastic bags, which end up trashing our streets, neighborhoods and parks, and often end up in our waterways and eventually the ocean (where waste plastic has become a huge problem.) The state was set to join dozens of individual communities (like the city of Sacramento) in banning their use, replacing them with re-usable bags. However, the plastic bag industry rushed to gather signatures to force the law into a ballot measure, delaying its implication, possibly nullifying it entirely.

The devastating environmental impact of the millions of bags we use daily is well-known, but visit www.cayeson67.org to learn more. The club voted to endorse a Yes vote on Prop. 67.

Another measure on the ballot that looks like a companion bill is Proposition 65. This measure, at first glance, may seem like an environmentally friendly move. It will establish that IF a plastic bag ban is passed, the money stores collect to provide re-usable bags will go to the Wildlife Conservation Fund.

There are a number of problems with this initiative, which was placed on the ballot by the same industry that is trying to kill the plastic bag ban. First of all, the reusable bags the stores may provide are not free—they will cost considerably more than the current bags, and more than the 10 cent minimum fee they will be required to charge. The stores will incur a loss every time a reusable bag is sold, both discouraging them to provide them, and forcing them to pass the loss on to consumers in higher prices for groceries—whether the customer bought a bag or brought their own.

Worse still, if passed, this measure will be in place even if Proposition 67 fails, waiting for the next time it is tried. And it is entirely possible that if both measures pass, and Proposition 65 gets more votes, its provisions could in effect nullify Proposition 67 entirely! (If both pass and 67 gets more votes, 65 will be nullified.)

The club voted to endorse a No Vote on Prop. 65.

Another guest at the September meeting was Brandon Rose, who is running for SMUD Board, District 1 (covering the eastern Folsom, Fair Oaks, Orangevale and Citrus Heights area.) Brandon is an Energy Specialist in the California Energy Commission’s Renewable Energy Office, Air Pollution Specialist with the California Environmental Protection Agency, and an elected official on the Fair Oaks Recreation and Park District for the past 8 years. He has also served as Chair of the Sacramento County Treasury Oversight Committee and President of the Environment Council of Sacramento. He has the endorsement of six current SMUD Board members, including Nancy Bui Thompson of District 2 (Folsom/Rancho Cordova.) Visit www.BrandonRose.net to learn more about him and his goals and background.

The club voted to endorse Brandon Rose for SMUD Board of Directors.

For a list of all official endorsements by the American River Democrats, see our Endorsement Page on this site.

17 Propositions in the Fall Election

At the American River Democrats meeting in August, Ken presented a discussion of the seventeen choices California voters will be facing in the November Election.

Here is a handy guide to what they each mean, and recommendations on each.

2016 props

Of course, the get the full details of any of them, review your Voter’s Information Guide when it arrives in the mail, or visit the California Secretary of State’s website.

Endorsements and recommendations

For the September Meeting of the American River Democrats, we were honored to have present three candidates for Folsom City Council, as well as guest speaker Rick Bettis from the League of Women Voters.

Folsom Mayor Kerri Howell, and new candidates for council Jennifer Lane and Sandra Lunceford each introduced themselves and spoke for two minutes at the meeting. Each had previously filled out candidate questionnaires for endorsement consideration. After they spoke the club voted by secret ballot, and endorsed all three. There are three spots open on the council this year, and three incumbents, including Howell are running for re-election.

Howell spoke of all the accomplishments the city has made since she has been on the council, including the only bridges over the American River built since then, and the upcoming opening of the Johnny Cash trail. Lane stressed her opposition to new development without more planning and water considerations. Lunceford spoke of the historical value of Folsom, and hopes it can become more of a destination for travelers.

Rick Bettis speaking to the club

Rick Bettis speaking to the club

Rick Bettis helped us to understand two of the initiatives on November’s ballot, and provided some more info on all of them as supplied by the League of Women Voters. Proposition 1, the water bond, may seem like an obvious choice, since California is suffering a major crisis and drought. However, there is a lot of opposistion along with support from various entities. Opponents say to much is spent on dams, which do little to increase supply, and endanger pristine wilderness areas. They say action is needed, but this bond is not the answer. Though “tunnel neutral”, it does pave the way for future delta tunnels, and is a giveaway to Southern California from the north. Supporters say that is is a needed solution to many of our agricultural and drought problems, building more storage capacity. There is also funds to protect wetlands and improve water quality and flood protection. The League of Women Voters has not taken a position on this proposition. The California Democrat Party has endorsed it.

The other initiative Bettis spoke about was Proposition 47, which reduces criminal sentences, and changes some non-violent and non-serious felonies to misdemeanors. The goal here is to reduce prison and jail populations, and provide more opportunities for offenders to get better educational and employment opportunities. Despite some concern that released offenders will have more opportunities to go back to victimizing law abiding citizens, both the League and the California Democratic party support the proposition. The thought is money now spend incarcerating low level drug and other offenders is better spent getting them back to being productive members of society.

The League of Women Voters also supports Proposition 2, the rainy day fund. They have taken no stand on props 45, 46, and 48.

The California Democratic Party also endorses Propositions 1 and 2. They also support proposition 48, approving Indian Gaming compacts. They recommend and No vote, however, on Proposition 46, which requires random drug testing for doctors, and raises the cap on malpractice lawsuits.

Melanie Ramil

Melanie Ramil

Proposition 45, which gives the State insurance commissioner approval power on health insurance rate increases, is also supported by the CalDems. Melanie Ramil was a guest at the August meeting of the club, and she gave us more detail about the initiative, which she and Insurance commissioner Dave Jones strongly supports. It would give the commissioner the same power he or she has over home and car insurance, and may help control increasing costs of health care.

The American River Democrats have made no official endorsements of these initiatives, but are glad our members have had a chance to learn about them. Documents attached here from Ballotpedia.com may also provide further details about each one:

Prop 1 Prop 2 Prop 45 Prop 46 Prop 47 Prop 48